Album Notes - The Murlocs - Bittersweet Demons

Album Notes - The Murlocs - Bittersweet Demons

July 29, 2021

"The murloc is a bipedal, amphibious, semi-intelligent, aggressive race residing along coastlines, lakeshores, and riverbeds. Murlocs possess bulbous bodies, large mouths lined with rows of sharp fangs, and slime-coated skin. Individuals range in coloration from turquoise to darkish grey, while their heights vary from 3-1/2 feet to 6 feet. Depending on the variety, murlocs may lean towards a closer resemblance to frogs or to fish; the iconic green murloc, for example, has coloration similar to the red-eyed tree frog. Though murlocs are relatively new to the Eastern Kingdoms, it is increasingly believed that they are actually a very ancient race of Azeroth. These creatures have been moving inland steadily from their oceanic dwelling places and inhabiting more areas of Lordaeron. This move inland has resulted in them adapting to fresh-water lakes and rivers."

If you understand the preceding paragraph on a level higher than "yes, those are words," feel free to skip ahead to the next one. However, if the quasi-word salad above induced blurred vision and has you scratching your head, welcome to how I felt after I did a quick search trying to decipher the meaning of the name of this week's artist. That led me to Warcraft (or is it World of Warcraft?), and if you're curious to read more, feel free to take a deep dive on the page I lifted the description from. If you get past what I copied and pasted above, congratulations, you made it further than me. Oh yeah, the Murlocs are also a quintet from Melbourne.

Comprised of members from a handful of other Aussie bands, including Ambrose Kenny-Smith, whose role turns from harmonicist and occasional singer in King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard to leader of this outfit, the Murlocs aren't really a side project nor do they sound like the Gizz, but rather another outlet for prolific musicians. Their fifth album in seven years, Bittersweet Demons is a notable evolution. Some of the garage, psych, and R&B of their previous output remain, but with 70s songwriting sensibilities and a polished glam rock twist. While not quite David Bowie or Elton John, it isn't hard to imagine Kenny-Smith in a flamboyant getup belting out these tunes from behind the piano.